Withdrawn 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate



Former Governor of Florida

John Ellis Bush
Born: February 11th, 1953  (age 64)

Jeb Bush Profile

All Issues
  Capital Punishment
    United States Capital Punishment Statistics
    Advocates, Opponents and Morality of Capital Punishment
    The Constitutionality of Capital Punishment
    Candidates' Positions on Capital Punishment
 


Jeb Bush on Capital Punishment

Bush supports capital punishment.

20 June, 2000: Article in the Sun Sentinel newspaper by then Florida Governor Jeb Bush.

Seventeen years ago, Fred Way fractured the skulls of his wife and 15-year-old daughter with a hammer and burned them alive in a locked garage. For these horrific crimes, a judge and jury recommended a death sentence, which the Florida Supreme Court unanimously reaffirmed in mid-April. Was their decision a "mistake" or an appropriate punishment for a heartless killer?

A new Columbia Law School study says the Way decision and dozens like it were the product of "serious error" and proof that Florida's death penalty system is "broken." In fact, according to the study, at least 73 percent of Florida death cases are "fraught with error." Predictably, the study's release made front page headlines and prompted new calls for a moratorium on executions.

However, when my staff reviewed the data, they were considerably less impressed.

First, they learned the study authors did not define "serious error" as mistakes in the ordinary sense of the word, i.e., Florida convicted the wrong man. In fact, the study's analysis of 64 state post-conviction death penalty cases showed a zero percent error rate using such a standard: Florida convicted the right man for the right crime every time.

Second, the study dramatically overstated the number of cases where an individual was sentenced to death based on a "mistake." For instance, in more than a third of the post-conviction cases cited, the death sentence was reaffirmed after further review by the courts. This includes the case of Fred Way, whose death sentence was reviewed again to make sure it complied with changes in the law occurring while his case was on appeal.

Other post-conviction cases cited by the study -- such as the case of Mauricio Beltran-Lopez -- were actually resolved with life sentence pleas, but only to spare the families of victims from the hardships of further court proceedings. Incredibly, the study authors also characterize these cases as error-filled.

Ironically, the study authors have some explaining to do about their own errors in characterizing Florida death penalty cases. For instance, the study authors mistakenly suggest that William Thompson's death sentence was reduced to a lesser penalty because of errors in his case. In truth, William Thompson remains on Florida's Death Row today for sexually assaulting a young woman before beating her to death with a chain belt.

Although the Columbia Law School study's flawed methodology and mistakes make it difficult for me to place great stock in the authors' analysis, it is important to focus on reducing any errors in death penalty cases. Florida is a leader in this regard, having invested millions of dollars to provide free post-conviction counsel to Death Row inmates.

The Florida Legislature has also provided needed funding for judges handling death penalty cases, including increases of 82 percent for our Supreme Court and nearly 71 percent for lower courts over the past decade. In addition, Florida's Cabinet is also committed to considering fully claims of innocence through the clemency review process.

But we must do more than remain vigilant on the subject of error. We must also reduce the extraordinary delays in capital cases. The loved ones of Fred Way's victims have been waiting 17 years for this killer to receive a fair measure of justice.
This is unconscionable and must change.

Earlier this year, the Florida Legislature passed the Death Penalty Reform Act of 2000, in an attempt to reduce delays in capital cases from 14 years to an average of five years. This was a reasonable policy goal that balanced defendants' due process rights with the need to resolve cases in a timely fashion.

The Florida Supreme Court struck down the act on separation of powers grounds, but can still adopt the Legislature's suggestions as a court-imposed rule. I respectfully suggest that they do so.

Most Floridians believe in the death penalty because they know it saves innocent lives and punishes only the most heinous criminals. They want public officials to review death cases carefully to avoid mistakes. But they also know justice can be delivered with much greater dispatch. I am committed to upholding the people's will in this regard.

http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2000-06-20/news/0006190542_1_death-penalty-cases-death-sentence-florida-death




Other Candidates on Capital Punishment

Hillary Clinton
Gary Johnson
Jill Stein
Donald Trump

Jeb Bush on other Issues

Abortion
Afghanistan
Capital Punishment
Cuba
Deficit and Debt
Education
Federal Budget
Gun Control
Health Care
Immigration
Jobs
LGBT Issues
Minimum Wage
National Security
Religion
Social Security
Taxes
Terrorism

Jeb Bush Links

Jeb Bush's campaign website
Jeb Bush's Facebook page
Jeb Bush's Twitter page
Share Jeb Bush's position on Facebook  
Share Jeb Bush's position on Twitter  
Compare Jeb Bush with others
 

Jeb Bush Books

 
Books by and about Jeb Bush
 

Jeb Bush Campaign Items

Bumper Stickers   Buttons   Cups   Hats    Shirts    Yard Signs   All Bush Items
 








PRESIDENTIAL
CAMPAIGN
SIGNS



 Presidential Candidates
 
Third Party Candidates
Republican Candidates
Democratic Candidates
Libertarian Candidates
Independent Candidates
Green Party Candidates
Constitution Party Candidates
   



 
 Presidential Debate Schedule
 
    RECAP 
September 26th, 2016   |   Hempstead, NY

    RECAP 
October 4th, 2016   |   Farmville, VA

    RECAP 
October 9th, 2016   |   St. Louis, MO

    RECAP 
October 19th, 2016   |   Las Vegas, NV

 
 2016 Election Issues
   
   



© 2017 Politicks.org
About Us
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Contact Us
Back   Top    Follow the presidential candidates on Facebook Follow the presidential candidates on Twitter